Loading Events
Saturday Jan 11

Mac McAnally

$29.50 - $55
Victory Theatre
Evansville, IN
Jan 11
Saturday
7:00 PM
Doors Open
All AgesBuy Tickets

More about this event

Learn More About This Show
Add to Calendar 01/11/2025 08:00 PM01/11/2025 11:30 PMMac McAnallyMore Information: https://mokbpresents.com/event/mac-mcanally/Victory Theatre
Jump to Venue Details

ARTIST PROFILE | Mac McAnally

CountryRock

For his new album, Once in a Lifetime, Mac McAnally is indeed doing something he’s never done before. To reflect the intimacy of his concerts, he arranged most of the material around guitar and percussion – yet he acknowledges that several of its tracks outgrew that simple set-up. And while many of the songs are new, he chose to include a few originals dating back to the early 2000s that seemed like a good fit.

So, with 12 songs pulled from different decades and musical directions, what ultimately ties all these tracks together? Simply put, it is McAnally’s ability to see the silver lining, a perspective he’s carried on his journey from being a shy, small-town kid from Mississippi, to working as a teenage studio musician in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, to becoming one of Nashville’s most respected (and self-effacing) singer-songwriters. Once in a Lifetime captures every aspect of his musical vision.

“I generally write whatever comes to me,” he says. “I’m not somebody who sits down and says, ‘I need to write a hit song,’ or this or that kind of song. I just follow whatever floats through my head.”

While writing “Alive and in Between,” McAnally drew upon childhood memories of Belmont, Mississippi, where his father was a school administrator and his mother played piano in the Baptist church. The song emerged from an art project, where novels were given to songwriters and visual artists, who would then create a piece based on their response to the book. In McAnally’s case, Harrison Scott Key’s memoir, The World’s Largest Man, sparked vivid snapshots from his own youth. McAnally translated those images into verses, then added a cool guitar riff he’s been using for years while tuning or changing strings.

“The author came from the same part of the country as me and it woke up a bunch of stuff about my childhood – what it was like hanging with my dad, going to the drugstore, talking about football, politics, and religion,” he says. “That opened up that part of my brain that I haven’t been down into for a while.”

One of the most uplifting songs on Once in a Lifetime is “Almost All Good,” where he’s aware of challenging times but doesn’t let them cloud his vision. Propelled by Eric Darken’s percussion, McAnally accompanies himself on guitar – with the lively rhythms adding a joyful spirit to the track. And this is not mere strumming, as McAnally has won a record-setting 10 trophies as Musician of the Year from the Country Music Association.

“All the way back to the beginning, my songwriting has been built around my guitar-playing because I’m not a very confident singer,” he says. “I was always trying to make a guitar part sound like a whole arrangement. There’s usually a bass part as a counterpoint in the main guitar part – but I’m not a fancy guitar player. I don’t take a lot of solos. Part of what’s allowed me to work so long in the business is that of all the bands I was in, I’ve never really wanted a solo. I would sit and play rhythm forever.”

McAnally notes that he typically sees three kinds of people at his shows: Those who have followed his career since his 1977 debut album; those who recognize him as the guitarist in Jimmy Buffett’s Coral Reefer Band; and those who remember his notable credits in country music. The latter category is particularly impressive, with songs cut by Alabama (“Old Flame”), Kenny Chesney (“Back Where I Come From”), Sawyer Brown (“All These Years”), Shenandoah (“Two Dozen Roses”) and many others.

Undoubtedly, Once in a Lifetime will satisfy all of those fans. “First Sign of Trouble” and “That’s Why They Call It Falling” are as quirky and quick-witted as the ‘70s output that made fans of Jimmy Buffett, Randy Newman, and John Prine (all of whom became friends and mentors). “Just Like It Matters” has that lonesome, real-life storytelling of classic country, while “Just Right” keeps the island vibe alive. In fact, it was written and recorded in Key West while Buffett was making his record; the Coral Reefer Band joined in the session, too.

“I’m interested in all kinds of music,” he says. “There’s obviously some Buffett influence on a few of the things and I’ve been playing country music and gospel music all my life, so there’s that influence, too.”

As for the title track, its cheerful message and buoyant melody wouldn’t be out of place on today’s country radio. McAnally and Nashville singer-songwriter Drake White composed it shortly after bumping into each other at a local breakfast spot. They casually chatted about getting together to write. Asked if he was enjoying himself these days, McAnally replied, “Yeah, every day. Every day is once in a lifetime.” White immediately replied, “We need to get together to write THAT!” White lends his vocal to the inspiring track, too.

Turning conversations into song is one of McAnally’s greatest gifts, one that led to his induction into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2007. Two of the songs from Once in a Lifetime come from that era. He co-wrote “Good Guys Win” for the 2006 film, Hoot, and felt like its optimistic tone needed to be heard in this divided time. In addition, the bluegrass-flavored “Brand New Broken Heart” comes from a 2007 demo session of a tune he recorded with his fellow studio musicians, but never got around to pitching.

However, a couple of tracks come from an even earlier time. Co-written and recorded by Jimmy Buffett in 1989, “Changing Channels” is one of the album’s most poetic moments – and a cut that McAnally’s fans have been requesting for decades. Meanwhile, he covers “Norwegian Wood” with just percussion, vocals and octave mandolin, in a sincere homage to the Beatles. “It’s just me celebrating how great they are,” he says.

The thoughtful lyrics of “The Better Part of Living” – and Once in a Lifetime as a whole – can perhaps be traced back to a phrase McAnally remembers from his childhood, when his mother would tell him to “make some use of yourself” on his way out the door. McAnally still adheres to that philosophy today. Asked about the experience of listening to these assorted songs that have now become an album, he modestly replies, “I see a guy trying to be a good representation of a human being. I hope there’s something in what I do that in some way can make someone else’s life a little bit better, too. That’s really what I’m shooting for.”

READ MORE >>READ LESS >>
CONNECT:

Supporting Acts

SHOW BY SIMILAR ARTISTS

Friday July 12
HI-FI
Indianapolis, IN

Summer Dean + Jeremy Pinnell

Presented by: MOKB Presents
Thursday August 8
HI-FI
Indianapolis, IN

Shaylen

Presented by: MOKB Presents
Thursday August 15
HI-FI
Indianapolis, IN

Silverada (fka Mike & The Moonpies)

Presented by: MOKB Presents
Friday August 23
Nickel Plate Amphitheater
Fishers, IN

Niko Moon

Presented by: MOKB Presents, Fishers Parks
Saturday August 24
Brown County Music Center
Nashville, IN

Aaron Lewis

Sunday August 25
Brown County Music Center
Nashville, IN

Aaron Lewis

Sunday August 25
HI-FI
Indianapolis, IN

Vandoliers

Presented by: MOKB Presents
Wednesday August 28
HI-FI
Indianapolis, IN

Fantastic Cat

Presented by: MOKB Presents
Saturday August 31
HI-FI Annex
Indianapolis, IN

The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band

Presented by: MOKB Presents
Saturday September 7
HI-FI
Indianapolis, IN

Pony Bradshaw

Presented by: MOKB Presents

About Victory Theatre | Evansville, IN

Box Office: 812-422-1515
Main: 812-436-7050

Getting Around the Venue

600 Main St,
Evansville, IN 47708
Hours: Mon. thru Fri. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Doors: 2 hours before showtime

Frequently Asked Questions About Victory Theatre | Evansville, IN

What are the age restrictions at this venue?

Typically Victory Theatre is an all-ages venue. However, some shows may not be suitable for younger audiences. Please contact Victory Theatre for more information about program content.

What items are permitted or prohibited at this venue?

The following items are prohibited from Victory Theatre:

  • Cameras with detachable lenses
  • Computers/ Laptops
  • Outside food or beverage
  • Cans, bottles, coolers, or other similar containers
  • Video Camera or audio Recorders
  • Laser pens or laser products
  • Noise Makers
  • Weapons of any kind
  • Backpacks
  • Diaper Bags
  • Clear bags larger than 12″ x 6″ x 12″
  • Clutch purse larger than 4.5″ x 6.5″
  • Fireworks or any incendiary device
  • Animals
  • Large Umbrellas
  • Flag poles or any support frames for banners/signs
  • Balloons
  • Any other items deemed unacceptable by Victory Theatre.

Can I bring a bag into the show?

All bags and purses entering the Victory Theatre must be clear, no larger than 12″ x 6″ x 12″ and are subject to search prior to entering the venue. Backpacks, fanny packs, non-clear bags, and diaper bags are prohibited from the Victory Theatre. Anything over the size of a hand sized clutch or wallet must be clear.

What’s the parking situation like?

Downtown Evansville features ample parking, including more than 1,200 spaces in City owned parking garages on Third St. and Sycamore St. Parking in the City-owned garages will be $7 during events at the Victory Theatre. Double Tree by Hilton, Deaconess Clinic, Fifth Third Bank and Old National also have parking garages Downtown. The Stone Family Center parking lot has 200 spaces and is located right behind the Ford Center between 5th and 6th Street. Entry is on Locust Street and parking in this lot is $10. The lot behind the Civic Center contains more than 1,100 parking spaces, which will be free during events at the Victory Theatre.

Victory Theatre is conveniently located across the street from the METS transfer terminal. Finding parking and getting to and from an event at the Victory Theatre in Downtown Evansville should not pose any undue problems for guests.

What is the camera/photo policy for this venue?

Video cameras are not allowed in the Victory Theatre. The use of non-professional still cameras, without flash, is permitted during certain events. Professional cameras are defined as cameras with a detachable lens. The use of still cameras during certain events hosted at the Victory Theatre will be determined on an event-by-event basis.

Is there food and drink at this venue?

VenuWorks provides all concessions and will be available at most events. For most events you may take food and beverage into the theatre. The Victory Theatre provides various items such as hotdogs, pretzels, nachos, chips, candy, soda, water, mixed drinks, beer, and wine.

View seating maps for this venue

Click HERE to view seating maps.

Can I leave and re-enter the venue?

The Victory Theatre has a no re-entry policy during events. Guests will not be allowed to leave during an event and re-enter during the same event. A new ticket must be purchased to re-enter the building.

Do you offer ADA, handicap or special needs options?

Yes! Victory Theatre has accommodated seating. Please click HERE to learn more about their policies.

Where is the box office located?

Victory Theatre utilizes the same box office as the Ford Center. The Ford Center ticket office is located on Main Street, on the North side of the arena.

I lost something at the show. Who do I contact?

All lost and found items are taken to the VenuWorks administrative office (located at the Ford Center) at the conclusion of each event. Each item is tagged with the event and the location of where the item was found. You can contact the main office at 812-422-8000 to inquire on lost items. Items will only be held for (30) days.

Beware of counterfeit tickets. How do I tell if my ticket is valid?

Victory Theatre is not able to guarantee that these tickets purchased through secondary sites are legitimate. By purchasing these tickets, you might be the victim of scalping. They have encountered situations where a patron purchases tickets through one of these websites, and finds out that the tickets were counterfeit at the event, so they are not able to attend the show. Sometimes, while you may receive real event tickets, you end up paying more than face-value for these tickets.

Ticketmaster is the official ticket provider of Victory Theatre.

In order to avoid missing an event, you should NOT purchase tickets from secondary websites unless it is an approved vendor of Victory Theatre.

All Ages
Jan 11

Mac McAnally

Victory Theatre
$29.50 - $55
Doors: 7:00 PM
Start Time: 8:00 pm

Learn More About This Show
Add to Calendar 01/11/2025 08:00 PM01/11/2025 11:30 PMMac McAnallyMore Information: https://mokbpresents.com/event/mac-mcanally/Victory Theatre

Buy Tickets

ARTIST PROFILE | Mac McAnally

CountryRock

For his new album, Once in a Lifetime, Mac McAnally is indeed doing something he’s never done before. To reflect the intimacy of his concerts, he arranged most of the material around guitar and percussion – yet he acknowledges that several of its tracks outgrew that simple set-up. And while many of the songs are new, he chose to include a few originals dating back to the early 2000s that seemed like a good fit.

So, with 12 songs pulled from different decades and musical directions, what ultimately ties all these tracks together? Simply put, it is McAnally’s ability to see the silver lining, a perspective he’s carried on his journey from being a shy, small-town kid from Mississippi, to working as a teenage studio musician in Muscle Shoals, Alabama, to becoming one of Nashville’s most respected (and self-effacing) singer-songwriters. Once in a Lifetime captures every aspect of his musical vision.

“I generally write whatever comes to me,” he says. “I’m not somebody who sits down and says, ‘I need to write a hit song,’ or this or that kind of song. I just follow whatever floats through my head.”

While writing “Alive and in Between,” McAnally drew upon childhood memories of Belmont, Mississippi, where his father was a school administrator and his mother played piano in the Baptist church. The song emerged from an art project, where novels were given to songwriters and visual artists, who would then create a piece based on their response to the book. In McAnally’s case, Harrison Scott Key’s memoir, The World’s Largest Man, sparked vivid snapshots from his own youth. McAnally translated those images into verses, then added a cool guitar riff he’s been using for years while tuning or changing strings.

“The author came from the same part of the country as me and it woke up a bunch of stuff about my childhood – what it was like hanging with my dad, going to the drugstore, talking about football, politics, and religion,” he says. “That opened up that part of my brain that I haven’t been down into for a while.”

One of the most uplifting songs on Once in a Lifetime is “Almost All Good,” where he’s aware of challenging times but doesn’t let them cloud his vision. Propelled by Eric Darken’s percussion, McAnally accompanies himself on guitar – with the lively rhythms adding a joyful spirit to the track. And this is not mere strumming, as McAnally has won a record-setting 10 trophies as Musician of the Year from the Country Music Association.

“All the way back to the beginning, my songwriting has been built around my guitar-playing because I’m not a very confident singer,” he says. “I was always trying to make a guitar part sound like a whole arrangement. There’s usually a bass part as a counterpoint in the main guitar part – but I’m not a fancy guitar player. I don’t take a lot of solos. Part of what’s allowed me to work so long in the business is that of all the bands I was in, I’ve never really wanted a solo. I would sit and play rhythm forever.”

McAnally notes that he typically sees three kinds of people at his shows: Those who have followed his career since his 1977 debut album; those who recognize him as the guitarist in Jimmy Buffett’s Coral Reefer Band; and those who remember his notable credits in country music. The latter category is particularly impressive, with songs cut by Alabama (“Old Flame”), Kenny Chesney (“Back Where I Come From”), Sawyer Brown (“All These Years”), Shenandoah (“Two Dozen Roses”) and many others.

Undoubtedly, Once in a Lifetime will satisfy all of those fans. “First Sign of Trouble” and “That’s Why They Call It Falling” are as quirky and quick-witted as the ‘70s output that made fans of Jimmy Buffett, Randy Newman, and John Prine (all of whom became friends and mentors). “Just Like It Matters” has that lonesome, real-life storytelling of classic country, while “Just Right” keeps the island vibe alive. In fact, it was written and recorded in Key West while Buffett was making his record; the Coral Reefer Band joined in the session, too.

“I’m interested in all kinds of music,” he says. “There’s obviously some Buffett influence on a few of the things and I’ve been playing country music and gospel music all my life, so there’s that influence, too.”

As for the title track, its cheerful message and buoyant melody wouldn’t be out of place on today’s country radio. McAnally and Nashville singer-songwriter Drake White composed it shortly after bumping into each other at a local breakfast spot. They casually chatted about getting together to write. Asked if he was enjoying himself these days, McAnally replied, “Yeah, every day. Every day is once in a lifetime.” White immediately replied, “We need to get together to write THAT!” White lends his vocal to the inspiring track, too.

Turning conversations into song is one of McAnally’s greatest gifts, one that led to his induction into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame in 2007. Two of the songs from Once in a Lifetime come from that era. He co-wrote “Good Guys Win” for the 2006 film, Hoot, and felt like its optimistic tone needed to be heard in this divided time. In addition, the bluegrass-flavored “Brand New Broken Heart” comes from a 2007 demo session of a tune he recorded with his fellow studio musicians, but never got around to pitching.

However, a couple of tracks come from an even earlier time. Co-written and recorded by Jimmy Buffett in 1989, “Changing Channels” is one of the album’s most poetic moments – and a cut that McAnally’s fans have been requesting for decades. Meanwhile, he covers “Norwegian Wood” with just percussion, vocals and octave mandolin, in a sincere homage to the Beatles. “It’s just me celebrating how great they are,” he says.

The thoughtful lyrics of “The Better Part of Living” – and Once in a Lifetime as a whole – can perhaps be traced back to a phrase McAnally remembers from his childhood, when his mother would tell him to “make some use of yourself” on his way out the door. McAnally still adheres to that philosophy today. Asked about the experience of listening to these assorted songs that have now become an album, he modestly replies, “I see a guy trying to be a good representation of a human being. I hope there’s something in what I do that in some way can make someone else’s life a little bit better, too. That’s really what I’m shooting for.”

READ MORE >>READ LESS >>
CONNECT:

Supporting Acts

About the Venue




600 Main St Evansville, IN 47708

More Shows Like This

Be the first to know

Subscribe for show updates, ticket alerts, merch deals and exclusive subscriber perks.