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Friday Nov 18

Todd Snider – American Troubadour Tour

$29.50 - $44.50
Old National Centre
Indianapolis,
Nov 18
Friday
6:30 PM
Doors Open

More about this event

Egyptian Room at Old National Centre - RESERVED SEATING

NO HEALTH CHECK REQUIRED
Learn More About This Show
Add to Calendar 11/18/2022 07:30 PM11/18/2022 11:59 PMTodd Snider - American Troubadour TourMore Information: https://mokbpresents.com/event/todd-snider-troubadour-tour/Old National Centre
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ARTIST PROFILE | Todd Snider

Americana/FolkSinger/SongwriterAlt-Country

Troubadour, meaning an itinerant singer of songs, is a word that dates back centuries, and comes from the French verb “trouver,” which is to find. These musical wanderers would find and invent stories humorous and intellectual, romantic and earthy, performing them as they went from town to town. Troubadour is also the word that acclaimed musician-raconteur Todd Snider leans on to describe himself and his latest release, Live: Return of the Storyteller.

“I think my first thought with this record was I wanted to remind people really quickly that I'm a troubadour,” says Snider. “Playing live is the only chance for me to show, 'This is what I really do.' I've never thought of myself as a recording artist. I'm someone who gets over by traveling around, telling stories, making up new songs and singing them alone on stage.”

Before he even made his professional debut with Songs For The Daily Planet in 1994, Snider already knew that he wanted to be part of this time-honored tradition. “I like the romantic notion of drifting around and laughing your way through life,” he says. “Like Jim Croce or Mark Twain. I felt like I was half-doing that anyway. When I was 19, I was a real drifter and a sofa circuit person. Then when I first saw Jerry Jeff Walker and John Prine play, I became obsessed. I followed them both around like The Grateful Dead. I saw that the difference between a free spirit and a freeloader was three chords.” 

“And as soon as I figured that out, I knew that it would help me as a person who didn't have a plan. Just to be a busker. I didn't want to sign up for normal life. I wanted to do another thing, and then it turned into a real gig. I was really surprised. It's still funny to be getting away with it.”

That speaks to Snider's modesty about his singular talent and deep catalog of songs of every emotional stripe. Rolling Stone has called him “America's sharpest musical storyteller” while the New York Times described him as “a wryly quotable phrasemaker and worthy antagonist.” Live: Return of the Storyteller – his third live album and nineteenth overall - plays like a masterclass by one man with a guitar and a freewheeling imagination. Threading his husky-voiced phrasing through a likable cosmic cowboy manner, he invites you on a tour of tunes humorous (“Big Finish,” and the have-meets- have-not “In Between Jobs”),  Proustian (“Play a Train Song,” “Too Soon To Tell,” and the lump-in-the-throat snapshot of John Prine on “Handsome John”) and heart-worn (“Like a Force of Nature,” “The Very Last Time,” “Roman Candles”). As the fifteen-song set unfolds, you can feel a tangible bond building between Snider and his fans. 

But the songs are only half of what makes the connection so compelling. 

Acting as palate cleansers and putty, the stories between numbers offer colorful glimpses into Snider's interior life. Whether he's talking about being mistaken for a homeless guy in a nice hotel, searching for a song in the woods while tripping or the poetry of one of his heroes dying on stage, his spoken interludes are delivered with both meandering charm and deadly comic timing. 

Snider credits an unlikely source of inspiration for both. “The comedian Richard Lewis is a friend and a mentor, and we talk almost every day,” Snider says. “We met about six or seven years ago through a drummer who's a mutual friend, and really hit it off. I feel like since I've known him, my storytelling has evolved. I don't know that I've gotten better, but a lot of the ways I approach my shows is from learning things from Richard. Especially this idea of being able to go on and on without just going on and on. To ramble without getting boring.”

Snider is also mindful about not repeating himself when he's returning to a familiar venue, which can add a tightrope quality to his performances. “On this record, when I left Nashville, I didn't know what I was going to say,” he admits. “I just knew that it couldn't be the same shit that I've said.  I was going to have to have some new stories to tell. That's how it's been for years. Then one night, I'll get up there and open my mouth and something new comes out. And then I'll just keep telling it and refining it. It happens under pressure.” 

The timing of Live: Return of the Storyteller's release has extra resonance in our post-pandemic era. Snider says, “I'm glad I recorded the tour last year, because that was the sound of the country getting to see live music again. It was unique and it won't happen again. Everyone just hugs at the start of a concert - you can tell that they're glad to see each other, and then they get more excited than they used to be about just being out and seeing music. I'm sure that it will go back to normal, but it hasn't yet.” 

While the album captures what Snider laughingly calls his “second tour - because I went out on the road in '94 and never went home until the pandemic” - it acts as both a summing up of a thirty-year career and a look ahead. 

“I always think that being a recording artist isn't something that I've thrived at,” he says. “I have fun with it and try all different kinds of music and try to learn more and more, but the only reason I get to do it is because of the main thing I do - which is travel around by myself and sing and tell stories. That thing works. Since I was twenty, that thing has worked. People come to see me do it and I love to do it.”

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Supporting Acts

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About Old National Centre | Indianapolis

Though it acquired its current name in 2010 — when its naming rights were sold to Old National Bank — the Old National Centre comes by the “old” part of its handle honestly. The venue first opened in 1909 as the Murat Temple, the meeting place of the Indianapolis Shriners, and its Middle Eastern–themed architecture made it an instant landmark that retains its striking appearance to this day. The venue features no less than nine different event spaces including the Murat Theatre at the Old National Centre, the Egyptian Room concert hall and the intimate Deluxe room, making this one of the most diverse and best concert venues in Indianapolis.

Box Office: 317-231-0000
Main: 317-231-0000

Getting Around the Venue

502 N New Jersey St,
Indianapolis, 46204
Hours: Fri. 12pm to 6pm
Doors: 2 hours before showtime

Frequently Asked Questions About Old National Centre | Indianapolis

What are the age restrictions at this venue?

Typically no, Old National Center is an all ages venue; however, some shows may be most suitable or restricted at the artist’s request due to adult content.

Can I upgrade my to VIP seating?

Many shows have the option to upgrade to the Imperial Lounge which includes an exclusive bar, private restrooms, and private entrance. Please look HERE for more information about upgrades.

What items are permitted or prohibited at this venue?

PROHIBITED ITEMS

• No Outside Food or Drink Allowed

• No guns, knives, weapons, pepper spray, projectiles of any kind, or any other item that could be used to inflict harm.

• Replicas of any type of weapon are NOT permitted.

• No drugs or drug paraphernalia, illegal substances of any kind.

• No personal video cameras, Go-Pros, selfie sticks, drones, masks or laser pointers.

• No professional audio, video, or audio recording equipment – (including detachable lenses, tripods, zooms or commercial use rigs)

• No unsealed liquids or gels of any kind

• No jewelry or clothing that could inflict harm

• No large bags over (10” x 10”), backpacks, Camelbacks or Bota bags

• No stuffed animals or toys of any kind

• This list of prohibited items is subject to change at the discretion of venue management

Can I bring a bag into the show?

Old National Centre has a clear-bag policy in effect, with a maximum size of 12”x6”x12”. Small clutch bags are also permitted with a maximum size of 4.5”x6.5”.

What’s the parking situation like?

The main parking lot can be accessed from Alabama Street, right in front of the venue’s marquee. Another lot can be found at the corner of North Street and New Jersey Street. Reserved parking can be purchased in advance through Ticketmaster.

What is the camera/photo policy for this venue?

The venue policy is any non-professional camera- which includes 35mm, instamatic cameras, or digital. Some tours in particular Broadway request no cameras. You may call the venue for more information within 48 hours prior to any given event.

Is there food and drink at this venue?

Yes. A full menu of food and drinks is available inside the venue one hour prior to performances. There are also numerous restaurant options outside along Mass Ave.

View seating maps for this venue

To view seating maps, click HERE.

Can I leave and re-enter the venue?

For information on Old National Center’s re-entry policy, please call their box office at 317-231-0000

Do you offer ADA, handicap or special needs options?

ADA tickets can be purchased online via www.livenation.com. Look for the logo on the Find Tickets page to view all available accessible seats. There is accessible seating in every price range but be advised it does occasionally sell out. There is very limited seating available for guests on the day of the event so please make sure you purchase accessible seating when you order tickets. If you are having problems locating tickets or have other questions please stop in to our Box Office or call the venue at 317-231-0000 for seat availability.

Unexpected Needs- If you have had an injury or illness that prevents you from using the original seat you purchased, we strongly recommend going through www.livenation.com to exchange all tickets for accessible seating. There are a very limited number of seats available on the day of the show for such issues, but cannot guarantee we will be able to seat you. Please remember that accessible seating permits for the guest with the accessible need and one companion.

I lost something at the show. Who do I contact?

Old National Center has a website for lost and found items. Please click HERE.

Beware of counterfeit tickets. How do I tell if my ticket is valid?

Old National Center uses Ticketmaster as its exclusive ticketing provider. All valid tickets will be issued through Ticketmaster. Customers are discouraged against purchasing tickets from the secondary ticket market and should do so at your own risk. If you would like to check the validity of a ticket please contact the Box Office at 317-231-0000

Nov 18

Todd Snider – American Troubadour Tour

Old National Centre
$29.50 - $44.50
Presented By: Live Nation, MOKB Presents
Doors: 6:30 PM
Start Time: 7:30 pm

Egyptian Room at Old National Centre - RESERVED SEATING

NO HEALTH CHECK REQUIRED
Learn More About This Show
Add to Calendar 11/18/2022 07:30 PM11/18/2022 11:59 PMTodd Snider - American Troubadour TourMore Information: https://mokbpresents.com/event/todd-snider-troubadour-tour/Old National Centre

Buy Tickets

ARTIST PROFILE | Todd Snider

Americana/FolkSinger/SongwriterAlt-Country

Troubadour, meaning an itinerant singer of songs, is a word that dates back centuries, and comes from the French verb “trouver,” which is to find. These musical wanderers would find and invent stories humorous and intellectual, romantic and earthy, performing them as they went from town to town. Troubadour is also the word that acclaimed musician-raconteur Todd Snider leans on to describe himself and his latest release, Live: Return of the Storyteller.

“I think my first thought with this record was I wanted to remind people really quickly that I'm a troubadour,” says Snider. “Playing live is the only chance for me to show, 'This is what I really do.' I've never thought of myself as a recording artist. I'm someone who gets over by traveling around, telling stories, making up new songs and singing them alone on stage.”

Before he even made his professional debut with Songs For The Daily Planet in 1994, Snider already knew that he wanted to be part of this time-honored tradition. “I like the romantic notion of drifting around and laughing your way through life,” he says. “Like Jim Croce or Mark Twain. I felt like I was half-doing that anyway. When I was 19, I was a real drifter and a sofa circuit person. Then when I first saw Jerry Jeff Walker and John Prine play, I became obsessed. I followed them both around like The Grateful Dead. I saw that the difference between a free spirit and a freeloader was three chords.” 

“And as soon as I figured that out, I knew that it would help me as a person who didn't have a plan. Just to be a busker. I didn't want to sign up for normal life. I wanted to do another thing, and then it turned into a real gig. I was really surprised. It's still funny to be getting away with it.”

That speaks to Snider's modesty about his singular talent and deep catalog of songs of every emotional stripe. Rolling Stone has called him “America's sharpest musical storyteller” while the New York Times described him as “a wryly quotable phrasemaker and worthy antagonist.” Live: Return of the Storyteller – his third live album and nineteenth overall - plays like a masterclass by one man with a guitar and a freewheeling imagination. Threading his husky-voiced phrasing through a likable cosmic cowboy manner, he invites you on a tour of tunes humorous (“Big Finish,” and the have-meets- have-not “In Between Jobs”),  Proustian (“Play a Train Song,” “Too Soon To Tell,” and the lump-in-the-throat snapshot of John Prine on “Handsome John”) and heart-worn (“Like a Force of Nature,” “The Very Last Time,” “Roman Candles”). As the fifteen-song set unfolds, you can feel a tangible bond building between Snider and his fans. 

But the songs are only half of what makes the connection so compelling. 

Acting as palate cleansers and putty, the stories between numbers offer colorful glimpses into Snider's interior life. Whether he's talking about being mistaken for a homeless guy in a nice hotel, searching for a song in the woods while tripping or the poetry of one of his heroes dying on stage, his spoken interludes are delivered with both meandering charm and deadly comic timing. 

Snider credits an unlikely source of inspiration for both. “The comedian Richard Lewis is a friend and a mentor, and we talk almost every day,” Snider says. “We met about six or seven years ago through a drummer who's a mutual friend, and really hit it off. I feel like since I've known him, my storytelling has evolved. I don't know that I've gotten better, but a lot of the ways I approach my shows is from learning things from Richard. Especially this idea of being able to go on and on without just going on and on. To ramble without getting boring.”

Snider is also mindful about not repeating himself when he's returning to a familiar venue, which can add a tightrope quality to his performances. “On this record, when I left Nashville, I didn't know what I was going to say,” he admits. “I just knew that it couldn't be the same shit that I've said.  I was going to have to have some new stories to tell. That's how it's been for years. Then one night, I'll get up there and open my mouth and something new comes out. And then I'll just keep telling it and refining it. It happens under pressure.” 

The timing of Live: Return of the Storyteller's release has extra resonance in our post-pandemic era. Snider says, “I'm glad I recorded the tour last year, because that was the sound of the country getting to see live music again. It was unique and it won't happen again. Everyone just hugs at the start of a concert - you can tell that they're glad to see each other, and then they get more excited than they used to be about just being out and seeing music. I'm sure that it will go back to normal, but it hasn't yet.” 

While the album captures what Snider laughingly calls his “second tour - because I went out on the road in '94 and never went home until the pandemic” - it acts as both a summing up of a thirty-year career and a look ahead. 

“I always think that being a recording artist isn't something that I've thrived at,” he says. “I have fun with it and try all different kinds of music and try to learn more and more, but the only reason I get to do it is because of the main thing I do - which is travel around by myself and sing and tell stories. That thing works. Since I was twenty, that thing has worked. People come to see me do it and I love to do it.”

READ MORE >>READ LESS >>
CONNECT:

Supporting Acts

About the Venue

Though it acquired its current name in 2010 — when its naming rights were sold to Old National Bank — the Old National Centre comes by the “old” part of its handle honestly. The venue first opened in 1909 as the Murat Temple, the meeting place of the Indianapolis Shriners, and its Middle Eastern–themed architecture made it an instant landmark that retains its striking appearance to this day. The venue features no less than nine different event spaces including the Murat Theatre at the Old National Centre, the Egyptian Room concert hall and the intimate Deluxe room, making this one of the most diverse and best concert venues in Indianapolis.



502 N New Jersey St Indianapolis, 46204

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